Medical Glossary for Diseases and Complications: (U)

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Use of Inhalers in Patients With Asthma

An asthma inhaler transports medication directly to the site of inflammation instead of passing through the bloodstream first. An inhaler can be either used as a control-type device to help prevent symptoms of asthma from occurring or as a rescue-type device to relieve symptoms on occurring. Controller inhalers are used every day to prevent acute attacks of wheezing or asthma, whereas rescue inhalers help in fast relief of an acute attack. Use your controller inhaler even if you do not have any breathing difficulty or if the symptoms are improving. You could use rescue inhalers to quickly reverse breathing difficulties when you come in contact with triggers such as dust, insects, mould, pollens, pet dander, stress, exercise (even a mild exercise can be a trigger) and cigarette smoke. Use rescue inhalers when you have sudden asthma symptoms, or unexpected asthma triggers. You could use rescue inhalers 15 to 20 minutes before starting physical activity and during an asthma attack while exercising. Avoid weather conditions which may trigger asthma attacksSide Effects From Inhalers:Soreness at the back of the throat after using steroid inhalers Thrush or infection in the mouth Hoarseness of voice Long-term use of steroid inhalers may cause osteoporosis A minor risk in children using inhaled steroid is that it may enter the body and delay growth in children